Tag Archives: tahrir square

6e: Amira – Women at Tahrir Square

By Carlos Latuff

[Prelude: Read my post for background information about what happened during the Egyptian Revolution.]

Saturday, January 29th – Evening

Amira was sandwiched between women to her right and men to her left. People flooded into Tahrir Square. The crowd condensed. The men and women clambered closer towards Amira. The young man standing on a fence to Amira’s right lead the chants. An Egyptian flag tied like a cape around his neck. His arms flew up in the air, beckoning God to answer their plea. The crowd roared and heaved after every statement he made.

Safwat Hegazy, a famous Egyptian TV commentator, popped up on someones shoulders. Everyone shifted their attention to him. Amira could only make out a few words. He was very passionate, his arms flailing and his facial expressions fierce and fiery. Amira roared, cheered and lost her voice with the crowd. Amira was sweating despite the cold February breeze. Amira could feel the heat pulsating from the bodies around her. Continue reading

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

5d: Youssef and Minna: The Tahrir Square Couple

[Prelude: Read my post for background information about what happened during the Egyptian Revolution.]

January 25th – Morning

“My parents won’t let me go to Tahrir Square, please come speak to them!”
Minna murmured through tears and gasps. Youssef guessed Minna had gotten into another fight with her parents. Youssef didn’t like getting involved in arguments between Minna and her parents, even though she was his fiance and they were his in-laws. This time it was different.

Youssef rang the doorbell to Minna’s house. Youssef waited, unable to stand still. He was itching to join the protests. His friend had just told him the rallies were massive, larger than anyone had expected. A minute later the door swung open, Minna’s large father filling up the door frame. His mustache messy, his eyes wide with anger, and his cheeks flushed.

“Is everything okay?” Youssef was scared to bring up the issue of joining the protests, he pretended to not know what was going on.

“Your fiance wants to go to Tahrir Square. She says you’re going and she wants to go with you. This is crazy!” Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

4d: Khalid – The Canadian-Egyptian Revolutionary

[Prelude: Read my post for background information about what happened during the Egyptian Revolution.]

Sunday, January 30th

“Dude it would be awesome if we went to Egypt right now.” Khalid told Hossam. Khalid leaned back against the kitchen counter, a crooked smile on his face. Khalid and Hossam were at their friends house for dinner. The conversation revolved around the Egyptian revolution of course. It was the only thing Arabs, and pretty much everyone else, spoke about these days.

I remember in my circle of friends, the Al Jazeera’s livestream from Tahrir Square was the permanent soundtrack of any gathering.

“Yo man, I’ll go if you go.” Hossam shrugged and replied in his deep, rumbling Canadian drawl. Khalid stared at Hossam. Neither one looked away. Neither one thought the other would go through with it and go to Egypt.

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

3e: So What Happened During the Egyptian Revolution?

The Camp that Toppled a President

The revolutions sweeping the Middle East right now are attracting a lot of international attention. They are raising questions and creating platforms for debates and conversation. These revolutions are often compared to the Iranian revolution in 1979 that ousted the American-backed Shah, comparing him to Egypt’s Mubarak. Egyptians labeling him the US puppet in the Middle East. People are also drawing comparisons between these revolutions, bloodless as they were in Egypt with the French revolution, the American revolution and Western revolutions in general.

On January 25th 2011, Egyptian youth, adults, children, males and females took to the streets. After witnessing the success of the Tunisian revolution in ousting Ben Ali, Egyptians knew it was their turn. Egyptian’s had three basic demands:  “عيش، حرية، عدالة اجتماعية” (bread, social equality and freedom). These three fundamental human rights soon became the revolution’s slogan.

The Revolution came as a surprise to many. It especially surprised President Hosni Mubarak who had been in power for 30 years and was planning his son, Gamal Mubarak’s ascension to the throne. This was among the reasons Egyptians revolted; they wanted to ensure their country did not become a monarchy, and they wouldn’t be forced to live the next 30 or more years under the same stifling and corrupt regime. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

2d: Mary – The role of religion in Tahrir Square

I'm an Egyptian Against Terrorism

[Prelude: Read my post for background information about what happened during the Egyptian Revolution.]

It was February 6th, the day after Mubarak had given his third speech, it spread rage and passion amongst the protesters as they elicited vows of murder if he did not step down. That morning Mary, 8 months pregnant, decided she couldn’t watch from the safety of her television screen any longer for fear of anything happening to her unborn son, and went to Tahrir Square.

After all, what was Mary going to tell her unborn son?

That she was afraid? And then expect him not to be afraid?

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

1f: Ahmed – The High School Convicted Baltagy

[Prelude: Read my post for background information about what happened during the Egyptian Revolution.]

On Tuesday January 25th 2011, while I was headed to class early in the morning, Ahmed geared up in his over-worn black shirt with an Egyptian flag ironed on. Together, Ahmed and his older sister, Sarah, marched out of their house and headed towards Tahrir Square.


The protests at Tahrir Square were in full force. People were no longer scared of the State security, the police, the government or even their family’s outrage for joining these sporadic protests. Once things had cooled down towards the evening and everyone regrouped, they realized Ahmed was missing. With Ahmed’s short height, small physique and typical dark curly Egyptian hair, it was difficult to spot him amongst a crowd. His friends and family checked everywhere, called Ahmed, texted him and sent out mass messages for people to stay on the lookout for Ahmed. Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized